Thursday, 1 January 2015

Magna Carta. An 800th-anniversary enquiry. The Binswanger/Griesinger ‘Magna Carta of Clinical Psychiatry’. Inner Circle Seminar 218 (14 June 2015)

Sarah-Rees-Yew-3.jpg (730×410)
The 2000-year-old Ankerwycke yew
that witnessed the signing of Magna Carta
across the Thames at Runnymede in 1215

Magna Carta
(15 June 1215)
An 800th-anniversary enquiry
Does Griesinger’s Magna Carta of Clinical Psychiatry (Binswanger) honour the principles of Magna Carta?

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 218
Sunday 14 June 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)

Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars. A 50th-anniversary revaluation. 4. Seminars of 11 and 14 May 1965. Inner Circle Seminar 216 (17 May 2015)


Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars

A 50th-anniversary revaluation


4. Seminars of 11 and 14 May 1965


‘We now make a leap to the body-problem.
Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch, 1963

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 216
Sunday 17 May 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)

Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Tensed Time and Free Will. Raymond Tallis conducts Inner Circle Seminar 215 (26 April 2015)


Tensed Time and Free Will
                
Raymond-Tallis-008.jpg (460×276)
Raymond Tallis

Raymond Tallis
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 215
introduced by
Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 26 April 2016
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Raymond Tallis gave the memorable Inner Circle Seminar No. 184 on 2 December 2012 in which he showed how biologism aspires to turn the ‘humanities’ into ‘animalities’. Today, he will continue to show the absurdity of reductionism. He will demonstrate the falsity of the purported use of neuroscience to disprove free will.

In the spirit of Samuel Johnson, Martin Heidegger and John Horton Conway, it may be asked why philosophers, psychotherapists or anybody at all should be trying to prove free will. Is not the onus on those who deny it to explain their belief? However, those who are wavering, tempted by the seduction of neuroscientism dressed as neuroscience, perhaps sensing its wrongness but unsure how to resist, will surely gain heart from the clarity and rigour of Raymond Talliss elucidation.


Raymond Tallis writes:

The seminar will be in two parts.

1. Determinism and Neurodeterminism: The Case Against Free Will

The traditional case for determinism is based on the assumption that humans are ultimately material objects – specifically their brains - wired into a causally closed universe. This metaphysical argument against free will has recently been supplemented by interpretations of experimental findings in neuroscience, notably those associated with Benjamin Libet and John Dylan-Hayes. Attempts to escape determinism and neurodeterminism by appeal to chaos theory, quantum indeterminacy, and the notion that humans break the laws of nature in virtue of being uncaused causes will be criticised.

2. Tensed Time and Human Freedom

The second part of the seminar will undermine the case for determinism first by critiquing the fundamental assumption that humans are their brains and human consciousness identical with neural activity. The discussion will begin with intentionality and its failure to fit into a world that seems to be causally closed. This will ground a critique of the notion of causation as an inherent property of the material world and will help us to understand how voluntary actions are possible in a world of material events (that include actions). The co-evolution of first-person being, selfhood, agency, and freedom will be examined. All of these will be connected with the temporal depth – made explicit in tensed time  that is unique to human consciousness. Freedom will be shown to be neither impossible nor an illusion.

Raymond Tallis BM BCh MA FRCP LittD (Hon Causa) DLitt (Hon Causa) F Med Sci FRSA was Professor of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Manchester and a consultant physician in Health Care of the Elderly in Salford until 2006. He also advised the government on health care of older people and in particular on the development of stroke services. He has published 200 research articles in the neurology of old age (epilepsy and stroke) and neurological rehabilitation, and original articles in NatureMedicineLancet and other leading journals. In 2000 he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. He received the Dhole Eddlestone Prize; the Founders Medal of the British Geriatrics Society; the Lord Cohen Gold Medal for Research into Ageing. He is Chair of Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying.

He has published a novel, short stories, three volumes of poetry, and 23 books on the philosophy of mind, philosophical anthropology, literary theory, the nature of art, and cultural criticism. These offer a critique of current predominant intellectual trends and an alternative understanding of human consciousness, the nature of language and of what it is to be a human being. For this he has been awarded two honorary degrees: DLitt (Hon Causa) University of Hull, 1997; and LittD (Hon Causa) University of Manchester 2002. 
In 2008 he was appointed Honorary Visiting Professor in the Department of English at the University of Liverpool. He writes op-eds for The Times and has a column in Philosophy Now. He is a regular at the leading literary and science festivals. He is a frequent broadcaster, with recent appearances on Start the WeekNightwavesInside the Ethics Committee and The Moral Maze. Among his recent books are Aping Mankind. Neuromania, Darwinitis and the Misrepresentation of Humanity (2011) and Reflections of a Metaphysical Flaneur and Other Essays (2013). 

In 2009, the Economist Intelligent Life Magazine listed him as one of the world’s 20 leading polymaths.


Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
                   Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Laing & Esterson: 3. The Churches. 50 years on. Inner Circle Seminar 214 (22 March 2015)

R. D. Laing
Aaron Esterson


Laing and Esterson
Sanity, Madness and the Family
(1964)

Continuing research on the families
50 years on

Family 3:
The Churches
Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 214
Sunday 22 March 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


We believe that the shift of point of view that these descriptions both embody and demand has an historical significance no less radical than the shift from a demonological to a clinical viewpoint three hundred years ago.

Thus, in 1964, R. D. Laing and Aaron Esterson introduced their revolutionary descriptions of eleven families of ‘schizophrenics’ in their epochmaking book Sanity, Madness and the Family: Families of Schizophrenics. But fifty years on, the ‘clinical viewpoint’ still rules supreme. Are Laing and Esterson ‘discredited’, as is claimed? Have they been proved wrong? Or are they not yet understood?

Most psychiatrists and psychotherapists say Laing and Esterson said families cause ‘schizophrenia’. However, in reality, Laing and Esterson wrote: ‘No one can deny us the right to disbelieve in the fact of schizophrenia.’

But most psychiatrists and psychotherapists will tell you that Laing and Esterson said: ‘families cause schizophrenia’  the very ‘schizophrenia’ they insisted they disbelieved in. In other words, most psychiatrists and psychotherapists find it difficult to read the plain English that Laing and Esterson wrote. They dont contradict it  they simply manage not to see it. Is this because it would be too threatening to them to see it and to consider it seriously?

What Laing and Esterson recorded and wrote about is the very stuff of life. As Hilary Mantel put it, in her introduction to the first seminar in this new subseries, it is the simple words the people speakThere is no psychology’ or metapsychology’ deeper than this, or behind’ itAs  Esterson said, these are the deepest secrets. But they are open to all. Everything is there, in a sense, on the surface, in what people say to one another.

This is the third of a new subseries of eleven Inner Circle Seminars on the eleven families studied in the book. We shall discuss Chapter 3, on Claire Church’ and her family, in the light of Anthony Stadlen’s continuing historical research on and with the living families, which renews, amplifies and clarifies Laing and Estersons research half a century on. Your contribution will be welcome.

‘The highly respected Anthony Stadlen, who has practised as an existential-phenomenological psychotherapist in London for over thirty years, continues to this day to hold well-attended and regular seminars in London on a wide variety of existential-psychotherapy-related topics, including dedicated all-day sessions focusing on the individual families featured in the ground-breaking work Sanity, Madness and the Family, first published over forty years ago.’
Adrian Laing, son of R. D. Laing (R. D. Laing: A Life, 2nd edition, 2006)

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857 E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars. A 50th-anniversary revaluation. 3. Seminars of 10 and 12 March 1965. Inner Circle Seminar 213 (8 March 2015)


Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars

A 50th-anniversary revaluation


3. Seminars of 10 and 12 March 1965


‘In making-present the Zürich main railway station, we are directed not to a picture of it, not to a representation ...
Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch, 1963

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 213
Sunday 8 March 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)

Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Is Psychoanalysis a Jewish Science? Freud and his Rebbe. Joseph Berke conducts Inner Circle Seminar 212 (15 February 2015)

Is Psychoanalysis a Jewish Science?
Dr.JosephHBerke.jpg (298×199)
Dr Joseph H. Berke
Freud and his Rebbe

Joseph Berke
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 212
introduced by
Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 15 February 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Nazis burned Sigmund Freuds books, persecuted Jewish psychoanalysts, and banned psychoanalysis as a Jewish science. Freud had gone to great trouble a quarter of a century earlier to protect psychoanalysis from such an apparently bizarre allegation by arranging that the Swiss ‘Aryan’ psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung should appear to be leading the psychoanalytic movement.

But David Bakan, in his book Sigmund Freud and the Jewish Mystical Tradition (1959), argued that there is an authentic sense in which psychoanalysis, springing from that tradition, is indeed a Jewish science (this does not imply that it is a natural science, as Freud claimed). In todays seminar, the psychiatrist and psychotherapist Dr Joseph H. Berke develops Bakans argument, and reports on Freuds relationship with, and treatment of, the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe.


Dr Joseph H. Berke writes:

Kabbalah is the Jewish mystical tradition. In the seminar I shall demonstrate the importance of Kabbalah to the development of Freud’s work and the way it has entered Western culture through psychoanalysis. I shall also show how these ideas have enriched our understanding of mental processes and clinical practices.

Hassidism is a mystical and religious renewal movement based on the Kabbalah.  Freud’s ancestors were hassidim going back many generations. I shall discuss how this background influenced Freud’s life and work. I shall show how he struggled to deny these roots
Sigmund Freud
in order to be accepted as a secular, German professional, and at the same time how he
 used them in the development of his ideas about dreaming, sexuality, depression and mental structures as well as healing practices.

Essentially psychoanalysis is a secular extension of Kabbalah.

Freud utilized the Jewish mystical tradition to develop a science of subjectivity.

This concerns:
1) The systematic exploration of human experience.
2) Uncovering the secret compartments of the mind.
3) Expanding human consciousness beyond ‘objective reality.
4) Exploring the deepest levels of the mind: preconscious and unconscious methods of thinking.
5) The revelation of hidden, unconscious thought processes by free association and dream analysis, all linked to kabbalistic  modalities such as ‘skipping and jumping .
6) The close connection between psychoanalysis, quantum physics and kabbalah.
Rashab.jpg (168×130)
Rebbe Rashab, the fifth Lubavitcher Rebbe

I shall begin by describing Freuds successful treatment of the great hassidic leader, the Rebbe Rashab, the fifth Rebbe of Lubavitch Hassidim.

I shall end by showing how Freud’s creativity has passed through generations of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.


Dr Joseph H. Berke is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist working with individuals and families. He is a lecturer, writer and teacher and has lived in London since 1965. He had attended Columbia College of Columbia University and graduated from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York.

Dr Berke moved to London to study with Dr R. D. Laing and assisted in establishing the Kingsley Hall Community. There he helped Mary Barnes, a middle-aged nurse who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia, to pass through a severe regression. Barnes later became a noted artist, writer and mystic. The book which Barnes and Berke co-authored, Mary Barnes: Two Accounts of a Journey Through Madness, was adapted as a stage play and has been performed in many countries. It has now been optioned as a feature film.

In 1970 Berke and colleagues founded the Arbours Housing Association in London to provide personal, psychotherapeutic care and shelter for people in emotional distress. Later he founded and was the director of the Arbours Crisis Centre.

Berke is the author of many papers and books on psychotherapy, social psychiatry, psychosis, therapeutic communities and transpersonal psychology as well as Kabbalah and Hassidism. This includes: Centers of Power: The Convergence of Psychoanalysis and Kabbalah (with S. Schneider, Jason Aronson, 2008). For further information, visit his website: www.jhberke.com.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857 E-mail: stadlen@aol.com 
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/
The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Laing & Esterson: 2. The Blairs. 50 years on. Inner Circle Seminar 211 (25 January 2015)

R. D. Laing
Aaron Esterson
Laing and Esterson
Sanity, Madness and the Family (1964)

Continuing research on the families
50 years on

Family 2: The Blairs
Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 211
Sunday 25 January 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

We believe that the shift of point of view that these descriptions both embody and demand has an historical significance no less radical than the shift from a demonological to a clinical viewpoint three hundred years ago.

Thus, in 1964, R. D. Laing and Aaron Esterson introduced their revolutionary descriptions of eleven families of ‘schizophrenics’ in their epochmaking book Sanity, Madness and the Family: Families of Schizophrenics. But fifty years on, the ‘clinical viewpoint’ still rules supreme. Are Laing and Esterson ‘discredited’, as is claimed? Have they been proved wrong? Or are they not yet understood?

Most psychiatrists and psychotherapists say Laing and Esterson said families cause ‘schizophrenia’. However, in reality, Laing and Esterson wrote: ‘No one can deny us the right to disbelieve in the fact of schizophrenia.’

But most psychiatrists and psychotherapists will tell you that Laing and Esterson said: ‘families cause schizophrenia’  the very ‘schizophrenia’ they insisted they disbelieved in. In other words, most psychiatrists and psychotherapists find it difficult to read the plain English that Laing and Esterson wrote. They dont contradict it  they simply manage not to see it. Is this because it would be too threatening to them to see it and to consider it seriously?

What Laing and Esterson recorded and wrote about is the very stuff of life. As Hilary Mantel put it, in her introduction to the first seminar in this new subseries, it is the simple words the people speakThere is no psychology’ or metapsychology’ deeper than this, or behind’ itAs Esterson said, these are the deepest secrets. But they are open to all. Everything is there, in a sense, on the surface, in what people say to one another.

This is the second of a new subseries of eleven Inner Circle Seminars on the eleven families studied in the book. We shall discuss Chapter 2, on Lucie Blair’ and her family, in the light of Anthony Stadlen’s continuing historical research on and with the living families, which renews, amplifies and clarifies Laing and Estersons research half a century on. Your contribution will be welcome.

‘The highly respected Anthony Stadlen, who has practised as an existential-phenomenological psychotherapist in London for over thirty years, continues to this day to hold well-attended and regular seminars in London on a wide variety of existential-psychotherapy-related topics, including dedicated all-day sessions focusing on the individual families featured in the ground-breaking work Sanity, Madness and the Family, first published over forty years ago.’
Adrian Laing, son of R. D. Laing (R. D. Laing: A Life, 2nd edition, 2006)

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857 E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/
The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars. A 50th-anniversary revaluation. 2. Seminars of 18 and 21 January 1965. Inner Circle Seminar 210 (18 January 2015)


Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch, 1963
Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars

A 50th-anniversary revaluation

2. Seminars of 18 and 21 January 1965

Can we disregard the human being altogether?


Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 210
Sunday 18 January 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.                                                                           

Anthony Stadlen writes:


Between 1959 and 1969 the German philosopher Martin Heidegger conducted seminars for psychiatrists in the home of the Swiss psychiatrist Medard Boss’s house in Zollikon near Zürich. (The first seminar was in the Bürghölzli mental hospital in Zürich.)

Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Boss, with Heidegger’s collaboration and consent, published a book containing reports of the seminars, and of his own conversations and correspondence with Heidegger (Heidegger, M., 1994 [1987], Zollikoner Seminare: Protokolle – Zwiegespräche – Briefe, herausgegeben von M. Boss, second edition, Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann).

Fourteen years later an authorised American translation was published (Heidegger, M., 2001 [1994], Zollikon Seminars: Protocols – Conversations – Letters, edited by M. Boss, Evanston IL: Northwestern University Press).

I showed in detail (Existential Analysis, 14.2, July 2003) that this American translation is not trustworthy. It often gives a highly distorted picture of what Heidegger is saying.

To give just one simple but telling example, Heidegger remarks with biting humour that the title of a congress of psychologists is ‘reichlich komisch’. Even if you know no German you might guess this means ‘richly comic’, and it does; but these rather humourless translators render it as ‘rather humorous’, thereby misrepresenting Heidegger’s justified contempt as bland praise.

This is rather typical of their whole enterprise, even though they took twelve years and were ‘helped’ by some of the world’s leading Heideggerian scholars. Often these translators are not even traducers of the proverbial kind, since to betray requires some understanding of what one is betraying.

These Inner Circle Seminars on the Zollikon seminars will go some way to remedy this.

In this second seminar on Sunday 18 January 2015 we shall look at Heidegger’s seminar of 18 and 21 January 1965, exactly fifty years earlier. This was the first of five seminars of 1965, his most active year in relation to the Zollikon seminars. Our seminar will thus have the same structure and time-scale as his: two three-hour sessions (with coffee and tea breaks) separated in our case by a lunch break and in his by three days.

Our subsequent seminars this year will examine the other seminars of 1965, and the seventh seminar, on 6 March 2016, will examine the two seminars of 1966 and one of 1969.

Subsequent seminars, to be announced in due course, will explore the important Boss-Heidegger conversations and correspondence reported in the book.

Whatever bad things Heidegger did in his long life, his Zollikon seminars were an act of decency and piety – even if he and Boss were naive in thinking that clinical psychiatrists, of all people, were likely to be receptive to his radical questioning of the foundations of psychotherapy. The seminars can be a force for great good in psychotherapy if we are prepared to take them slowly and seriously, and open ourselves to their profound simplicity. They are revolutionary in their return to beginnings, saying ‘the same thing in the same way’ – which, as Heidegger points out, Socrates said was the hardest of all.

You should bring a copy of the American translation if you attend any of the seminars, and if you know a little German it would be helpful to bring a copy of the original. But I will provide my own corrected translations of numerous passages. In many instances, these reveal an astonishingly different meaning from that proposed by the American translation.

These seminars will, in such cases, give English speakers for the first time an idea of what Heidegger is really saying.

You can attend any or all of these seminars. Each is self-contained, but it would be advantageous to attend all seven (and you also pay a reduced fee for the seven: students £700, others £875).

1. 30 November 2014
(Inner Circle Seminar No. 208)
Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars of 1959-1964
‘How does Dr R. relate to this table here?’
(Inner Circle Seminar No. 210)
Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars of 18 and 21 January 1965
‘Can we disregard the human being altogether?’
(Inner Circle  Seminar No. 213)
Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars of 10 and 12 March 1965
‘In making-present the Zürich main railway station, we are directed not to a picture of it, not to a representation ...’
(Inner Circle  Seminar No. 216)
Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars of 11 and 14 May 1965
‘We now make a leap to the body-problem.’
(Inner Circle Seminar No. 219)
Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars of 6 and 8 July 1965
‘Is the body and its bodying ... something somatic or something psychic or neither of the two?’
(Inner Circle Seminar No. 224)
Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars of 23 and 26 November 1965
‘Whence comes the insight that ... the Sein of the Da is ecstatic ... ?’

7. 6 March 2016
(Inner Circle Seminar No. 228)
Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars of 1 and 3 March 1966
‘Unburdening and burdening are possible only through the human being’s ecstatic being-outstretched.


Venue: ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE

Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £120 per seminar or £700 the subseries of seven, others £150 or £875 the subseries of seven); some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7X
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.