Thursday, 1 January 2015

Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars. A 50th-anniversary revaluation. 7. Seminars of 1 and 3 March 1966. Inner Circle Seminar 228 (6 March 2016)


Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars

A 50th-anniversary revaluation


7. Seminars of 1 and 3 March 1966


‘Unburdening and burdening are possible only through the human being's ecstatic being-outstretched
Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 228
Sunday 6 March 2016
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Venue:  ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE

Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

‘Slips of the Freudians’. A dispute between Marxists – 40 years on. Inner Circle Seminar 226 (12 January 2016)

Sebastiano_Timpanaro.jpg (288×385)
Sebastiano Timpanaro

‘Slips of the Freudians’
A dispute between Marxists
40 years on

Sebastiano Timpanaro’s book The Freudian Slip (1974), criticisms by Juliet Mitchell and Jacqueline Rose (November/December 1975), and Timpanaro's response (January/February 1976)

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 226
Sunday 12 January 2016
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars. A 50th-anniversary revaluation. 6. Seminars of 23 and 26 November 1965. Inner Circle Seminar 224 (22 November 2015)


Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars

A 50th-anniversary revaluation


6. Seminars of 23 and 26 November 1965


‘Whence comes the insight that ... the Sein of the Da is ecstatic ...?
Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 224
Sunday 22 November 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Venue:    ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE

Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Bion and Beckett hear Jung. Inner Circle Seminar 222 (4 October 2015)


Bion and Beckett hear Jung
'She had never been really born'
An investigation 80 years on
bion-ok1.jpeg (497×509)
Wilfred Bion 
Beckett3.jpg (1022×1200)
Samuel Beckett
Carl-Gustav-Jung.jpg (533×600)
Carl Gustav Jung

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 222
Sunday 4 October 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Venue: Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
                  Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Laing & Esterson. 3. The Churches. 50 years on. Inner Circle Seminar 219 (19 July 2015)


R. D. Laing
Aaron Esterson

Laing and Esterson
Sanity, Madness and the Family
(1964)

Continuing research on the families
50 years on

Family 3
The Churches

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 219
Sunday 19 July 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

We believe that the shift of point of view that these descriptions both embody and demand has an historical significance no less radical than the shift from a demonological to a clinical viewpoint three hundred years ago.

Thus, in 1964, R. D. Laing and Aaron Esterson introduced their revolutionary descriptions of eleven families of ‘schizophrenics’ in their epochmaking book Sanity, Madness and the Family: Families of Schizophrenics. But fifty years on, the ‘clinical viewpoint’ still rules supreme. Are Laing and Esterson ‘discredited’, as is claimed? Have they been proved wrong? Or are they not yet understood?

Laing and Esterson wrote: ‘No one can deny us the right to disbelieve in the fact of schizophrenia.’ Their fundamental question was:

Are the experience and behaviour that psychatrists take as symptoms and signs of schizophrenia more socially intelligible than has come to be supposed?

But most psychiatrists and psychotherapists will tell you that Laing and Esterson said: ‘families cause schizophrenia’  the very ‘schizophrenia’ they insisted they disbelieved in. In other words, most psychiatrists and psychotherapists find it difficult to read the plain English that Laing and Esterson wrote. They dont contradict it  they simply manage not to see it. Is this because it would be too threatening to them to see it and to consider it seriously?

What Laing and Esterson recorded and wrote about is the very stuff of life. As Hilary Mantel put it, in her moving introduction to the first seminar in this new subseries, it is the simple words the people speakThere is no psychology’ or metapsychology’ deeper than this, or behind’ itAs  Esterson said, these are the deepest secrets. But they are open to all. Everything is there, in a sense, on the surface, in what people say to one another.

Mantel described in 2008 how the book gave her the courage to become a writer:

The people in it seemed close enough to touch... Each interview is a novel or play in miniature. So many of these family conversations seemed familiar to me: their swerves and evasions, their doubleness... For most of my life I had been told that I didn't know how the world worked. That afternoon I decided I did know, after all. In the course of my twenty-one years I'd noticed quite a lot. If I wanted to be a writer, I didn't have to worry about inventing material, I'd already got it. The next stage was just to find some words.

She also wrote:

All the patients profiled in the book are young women. I know their names are pseudonyms, but over the years I've wondered desperately what happened to them, and if there's anyone alive who knows, and whether any of them ever cut free from the choking knotweed of miscommunication and flourished on ground of their own: Ruth, who was thought odd because she wore coloured stockings; Jean, who wanted a baby though her whole family told her she didn't; and Sarah, whose breakdown, according to her family, was caused by too much thinking.

(http://www.theguardian.com/books/2008/sep/06/1)

From my historical research, I am able to answer some of Hilary Mantels questions. In this seminar I shall report my findings on Claire Church and her family, including a follow-up investigation of her life during the more than fifty years since the family discussions conducted by Esterson in 1959 and reported in the book of 1964.

As Laing and Esterson wrote:

Surely, if we are wrong, it would be easy to show that we are, by studying a few families and revealing that 'schizophrenics' really are talking a lot of nonsense after all.

Might not new light also be thrown on this question by answering Hilary Mantel’s question about what happened later to the eleven women in Laing and Esterson’s book and studying the development over the next half-century of the same families that they studied? This is what I have done, over the last fifteen years, and I invite you to collaborate in assessing their findings and mine at the seminar on 22 March.

‘The highly respected Anthony Stadlen, who has practised as an existential-phenomenological psychotherapist in London for over thirty years, continues to this day to hold well-attended and regular seminars in London on a wide variety of existential-psychotherapy-related topics, including dedicated all-day sessions focusing on the individual families featured in the ground-breaking work Sanity, Madness and the Family, first published over forty years ago.’
Adrian Laing, son of R. D. Laing (R. D. Laing: A Life, 2nd edition, 2006)

Venue: ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Cost: Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra Avenue, London N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857 E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/


The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars. A 50th-anniversary revaluation. 5. Seminars of 6 and 8 July 1965. Inner Circle Seminar 218 (5 July 2015)


Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Heidegger's Zollikon Seminars

A 50th-anniversary revaluation


5. Seminars of 6 and 8 July 1965


‘Is the body and its bodying ... something somatic or something psychic or neither of the two?
Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 218
Sunday 5 July 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Between 1959 and 1969 the German philosopher Martin Heidegger conducted seminars for psychiatrists in the Swiss psychiatrist Medard Boss’s house in Zollikon near Zürich. Fifty years later almost to the day, we focus on his seminar of 6 and 8 July 1965, the fourth of his five that year. He continues to bewilder his scientifically trained psychiatrist and psychologist listeners by invoking a way of ‘bodily’ thinking that precedes any split into ‘soma’ and ‘psyche’. He laments that Descartes’s ‘strange’ theory imposes a calculative ‘dictatorship’ of ‘mind’ on the world. He invites the astonished participants to experience bodily the simple act of measuring the diameter of a table. He invokes a more primordial meaning of ‘count’ and ‘measure’. We shall try to recapture some of the spirit of this great seminar.

Venue:    ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE

Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Tensed Time and Free Will. Raymond Tallis conducts Inner Circle Seminar 217 (28 June 2015)


Tensed Time and Free Will
                
Raymond-Tallis-008.jpg (460×276)
Raymond Tallis

Raymond Tallis
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 217
introduced by
Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 28 June 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Raymond Tallis gave the memorable Inner Circle Seminar No. 184 on 2 December 2012 in which he showed how biologism aspires to turn the ‘humanities’ into ‘animalities’. Today, he will continue to show the absurdity of reductionism. He will demonstrate the falsity of the purported use of neuroscience to disprove free will.

In the spirit of Samuel Johnson, Martin Heidegger and John Horton Conway, it may be asked why philosophers, psychotherapists or anybody at all should be trying to prove free will. Is not the onus on those who deny it to explain their reasons? However, those who are wavering, tempted by the seduction of neuroscientism dressed as neuroscience, perhaps sensing its wrongness but unsure how to resist, will surely gain heart from the clarity and rigour of Raymond Talliss elucidation.


Raymond Tallis writes:

The seminar will be in two parts.

1. Determinism and Neurodeterminism: The Case Against Free Will

The traditional case for determinism is based on the assumption that humans are ultimately material objects – specifically their brains - wired into a causally closed universe. This metaphysical argument against free will has recently been supplemented by interpretations of experimental findings in neuroscience, notably those associated with Benjamin Libet and John Dylan-Hayes. Attempts to escape determinism and neurodeterminism by appeal to chaos theory, quantum indeterminacy, and the notion that humans break the laws of nature in virtue of being uncaused causes will be criticised.

2. Tensed Time and Human Freedom

The second part of the seminar will undermine the case for determinism first by critiquing the fundamental assumption that humans are their brains and human consciousness identical with neural activity. The discussion will begin with intentionality and its failure to fit into a world that seems to be causally closed. This will ground a critique of the notion of causation as an inherent property of the material world and will help us to understand how voluntary actions are possible in a world of material events (that include actions). The co-evolution of first-person being, selfhood, agency, and freedom will be examined. All of these will be connected with the temporal depth – made explicit in tensed time  that is unique to human consciousness. Freedom will be shown to be neither impossible nor an illusion.

Raymond Tallis BM BCh MA FRCP LittD (Hon Causa) DLitt (Hon Causa) F Med Sci FRSA was Professor of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Manchester and a consultant physician in Health Care of the Elderly in Salford until 2006. He also advised the government on health care of older people and in particular on the development of stroke services. He has published 200 research articles in the neurology of old age (epilepsy and stroke) and neurological rehabilitation, and original articles in NatureMedicineLancet and other leading journals. In 2000 he was elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. He received the Dhole Eddlestone Prize; the Founders Medal of the British Geriatrics Society; the Lord Cohen Gold Medal for Research into Ageing. He is Chair of Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying.

He has published a novel, short stories, three volumes of poetry, and 23 books on the philosophy of mind, philosophical anthropology, literary theory, the nature of art, and cultural criticism. These offer a critique of current predominant intellectual trends and an alternative understanding of human consciousness, the nature of language and of what it is to be a human being. For this he has been awarded two honorary degrees: DLitt (Hon Causa) University of Hull, 1997; and LittD (Hon Causa) University of Manchester 2002. 
In 2008 he was appointed Honorary Visiting Professor in the Department of English at the University of Liverpool. He writes op-eds for The Times and has a column in Philosophy Now. He is a regular at the leading literary and science festivals. He is a frequent broadcaster, with recent appearances on Start the WeekNightwavesInside the Ethics Committee and The Moral Maze. Among his recent books are Aping Mankind. Neuromania, Darwinitis and the Misrepresentation of Humanity (2011) and Reflections of a Metaphysical Flaneur and Other Essays (2013). 

In 2009, the Economist Intelligent Life Magazine listed him as one of the world’s 20 leading polymaths.


Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
                   Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Magna Carta. An 800th-anniversary enquiry. The Binswanger/Griesinger ‘Magna Carta of Clinical Psychiatry’. Inner Circle Seminar 216 (14 June 2015)

Sarah-Rees-Yew-3.jpg (730×410)
This 2000-year-old Ankerwycke yew witnessed the sealing of Magna Carta
across the Thames at Runnymede on 15 June 1215
Magna Carta
(15 June 1215)
An 800th-anniversary enquiry
Does psychiatry violate the principles of Magna Carta?

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 216
Sunday 14 June 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

On 15 June 2015, King John met his barons in the meadow at Runnymede on the Thames where his Great Seal was affixed to Magna Carta, the foundation of British justice and freedom. Over subsequent centuries, certain practices and institutions, hitherto accepted as part of the natural or divine order, became recognised as violating Magna Carta. One such practice was slavery. Could another, still unrecognised, be involuntary psychiatry? The supposedly  existential psychiatrist Ludwig Binswanger claimed that the nineteenth-century psychiatrist Wilhelm Griesinger had written ‘the Magna Carta of clinical psychiatry’ – but neither Griesinger nor Binswanger mentioned that psychiatric incarceration and compulsory treatment were the norm. Do these practices  – and the insanity defence – violate Magna Carta? Should they, as Thomas Szasz urged, be abolished?


Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Aluna: The Philosophy of the Kogi. Alan Ereira conducts Inner Circle Seminar 215 (31 May 2015)

alarreg_thumb.jpeg (190×286)
Alan Ereira and Arregoces

Aluna
The Philosophy of the Kogi

Alan Ereira
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 215
introduced by Anthony Stadlen
Sunday 31 May 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Heidegger’s philosophy resembles in many respects that of the Kogi, an indigenous people in Columbia who have no wheels and no writing but are highly advanced spiritually and culturally. Both warn that with our ‘civilised’ technology we are destroying the earth. This, they both say, is because our meditative thinking has not caught up with – has not grounded – our calculative ‘thinking’. Indeed, the Kogi, like Heidegger, say that our science cannot think.

However, there is a divergence. Heidegger insisted that ‘the Dreadful has already happened’. Precisely if all life on earth is not extinguished by our foolishness, we face the even more terrible danger, as he saw it, of surviving, with everything ‘working’, but with the essence of our humanity, our meditative thinking, destroyed. The Kogi do not appear to envisage even this ‘optimistic’ outcome. They are afraid that we, the ‘Younger Brother’, will simply destroy the earth and ourselves, bringing them, the ‘Elder Brother’, down with us.

We are privileged that Alan Ereira, whom the Kogi chose a quarter of a century ago to help them make a film to warn about the destruction we are wreaking, will show us on 31 May the new film, Aluna, the Kogi and he have made to make their message even clearer. He will also discuss their philosophy of Aluna in a way appropriate to the Inner Circle Seminars, in more depth, and with more dialogue, than is usually possible.

Alan Ereira writes:

Aluna

The word Aluna comes from the language of a people called the Kogi by us, and the Kaggaba by themselves. It is the very core of their understanding of the world. So first I need to tell you quickly about the Kogi. They inhabit a mountain massif in northern Colombia, which is where the Spanish first discovered South America. It’s the highest coastal mountain in the world, rising from the Caribbean to glaciers and snow-fields peaking at over 19000 feet in just 25 miles. And that was their salvation. When the Spanish tried to take them over they simply moved into a pretty impenetrable fastness, and for the next 400 years, they managed to hold their civilisation together. And I use the word civilisation advisedly. They don’t have the wheel, or writing, but they do have cities, spiritual leaders called Mamas – Enlightened Ones – and a profound and serious philosophical system. Which begins like this:

In the beginning, there was blackness.

Only the sea.
In the beginning there was no sun, no moon, no people.
In the beginning there were no animals, no plants.
Only the sea.
The sea was the Mother.
The Mother was not people, she was not anything.
Nothing at all.
She was when she was, darkly.
She was memory and potential.
She was
aluna.

Aluna is pure thought and pure energy – the energy of life. Memory and potential, past and future. And Aluna, they say, opened a space within herself, a space between past and future, which is the material world. The present. The moment. Where we have our physical being. And everything here is just a trace of thought-structures in Aluna, visible, tangible echoes of what is past and what may be to come.


So Aluna is, in a sense, the amniotic fluid in which the world was made, and one of its traces is water. Water is, as it were, the physical trace of pure spirit. When the Kogi Mamas want to know what needs to be done, they consult a bowl of water. Of course the idea of the Primal Ocean doesn’t just belong to the Kogi. The Aluna project seems to me to draw together a number of threads of thought and culture that have been quite fundamental to human society. It is a form of timekeeping which is based on the connection between earth, moon and sea. The ways that different cultures have understood that connection are remarkably similar, and all go to the very heart of our understanding of the cosmos.


The sea has always been understood as more than just a body of water. It is literally primal, the substance from which creation began. The Hebrew Bible speaks of God beginning creation by dividing the waters below from the waters above. In the original Hebrew the words are Mayim (waters) and Sha-mayim (sky or heavens). These waters are the womb-waters from which life emerged, seas of spirit. This also corresponds to making a space between the two parts of Aluna, memory and possibility, past and future. The material world is the present – and it is us, because out of the separation emerges Adamah, Hebrew for Earth, mud – female – from which is shaped Adam – the Hebrew word for Man.


That idea of an original spirit-ocean is echoed in later Christian writing. The Gospel of St. John begins “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God”. In the original Greek, Word is “logos”, which means spirit and reason. It is in fact a reference, in a different metaphor, to the Waters of Genesis. And of course this is not just a Judeo-Christian idea.


Whether it is Marduk, the God of Babylon, bringing forth the world from the primeval ocean, or the Voodoo god Damballah the sky-serpent beginning creation with water, or the endless waters at the start of the Hopi creation story, almost all peoples seem to understand the cosmos as starting with an ocean which is a sea of spirit as well as of material water. It is not surprising that in the Kogi language Water and Spirit can be the same word – Aluna. This spirit-sea is a source of life, but it is also a sea of chaos, wild and disordered. That is also true in all these different religions. The Egyptian Nun was the primaeval ocean of chaos from which emerged Ra and then order. It is threatening as well as beneficent. That is the significance of the very widespread stories of a great flood, which threatens to sweep away all order and restore the original chaos. All creation stories are about the process of creating order, and the tale begins with the sky. The heavenly bodies perform the first step in ordering the world, and the moon plays a central role, because the link between the moon and the sea is obvious to anyone with access to a beach. The ebb and flow of tides are the obvious evidence that the heavens and earth are linked, and that the ordering of the heavens created an order on earth.


Here is the beginning of astrology, the art of reading the sky-shaping of destiny, the belief which extended through almost every human society that as in heaven, so on earth. And here too is the beginning of time-keeping and the calendar, which allow human beings to claim to have some grasp of a cosmic story which processes through the sky and works itself out on earth. This grasp is necessary because human beings have always known that they are not quite part of the machine. They can choose their own actions, and they need to understand what is happening in heaven and on earth to make the right choices. That is where calendars began – and, eventually, clocks. The first European clocks were devised to determine hours of prayer, not hours of work.


The shift from a lunar to a solar calendar was one of the greatest changes in our civilisation, and it was a shift that was never quite completed. It was necessary as soon as we became agricultural. The moon shapes tides, and is linked to human fertility – we still talk of the menstrual cycle, the cycle of months, and those months are the time from one new moon to the next. But agriculture is seasonal, and seasons are timed by the orbit of the earth around the sun, not the orbit of the moon around the earth. The first solar calendar we know was the Egyptian, six thousand years ago – actually it was based on observing a star, Sirius, rather than the sun, and it was linked of course to the flooding of the Nile. And the problem from then on was to bring the solar and lunar calendars together. Tricky. The earth goes round the sun every 365 days 6 hours 9 minutes and 9 seconds. Roughly. Which is why we need leap years. The moon goes round the earth every 27 days 7 hours 43 minutes and 11.5 seconds. Roughly. Which means that there are 13.36875 lunar months in a year. Roughly. Which is why Muslims, who use a lunar calendar, have Ramadan in a different season every year. Tricky for Easter, a seasonal Spring festival but tied to the lunar calendar. Establishing a date for Easter that could fit in the solar calendar was a major challenge to theologians and mathematicians. Every Spring we celebrate, in one way or another, resurrection and new life according to a calendar set by the moon. That link between sea, sky and time remained central to society, and the development of a time-keeping system that allowed men to carry time on ships made modern navigation possible. Time keeping gave us possession of the world. Today, we carry clocks wherever we go – in our computers, in our phones, in our televisions. Timekeeping is the fundamental heartbeat of our world, but we have rather forgotten what it means, and lost sight of our own roots. The sun, the moon, the sea, the tides, the links between spirit and the material world, between creation, chaos and order – all this is contained in the idea of time, and in the word Aluna.


Recently I was with the Kogi. I saw that the glaciers and snows on the mountain have almost melted away, the waters that feed the rivers have almost dried up, the sea at the bottom is so polluted that you can’t sink in it – you float as if you were in the Dead Sea. Dead Sea. And Kogi society is now being invaded, by a combination of armed violence and commercial development hungry for resources. Perhaps it’s too late to save them, to save ourselves, to save life on earth. But if we are to stand any chance at all, we need to learn how to contemplate the transcendental cosmos of thought and energy from which we were born.


We need to be aware of Aluna.


(See: http://blacklineinitiative.org/?tribe_events=aluna-the-philosophy-of-the-kogi-alan-ereira-conducts-inner-circle-seminar-215

Venue:   Durrants Hotel, 26–32 George Street, Marylebone, London W1H 5BJ (http://www.durrantshotel.co.uk/)
Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled
Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com
For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.

Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars. A 50th-anniversary revaluation. 4. Seminars of 11 and 14 May 1965. Inner Circle Seminar 214 (10 May 2015)


Martin Heidegger
at home in Freiburg
Heideggers Zollikon Seminars

A 50th-anniversary revaluation


4. Seminars of 11 and 14 May 1965


‘We now make a leap to the body-problem.
Martin Heidegger and Medard Boss
on the Feldweg south of Messkirch, 1963

Anthony Stadlen
conducts
Inner Circle Seminar No. 214
Sunday 10 May 2015
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Between 1959 and 1969 the German philosopher Martin Heidegger conducted seminars for psychiatrists in the Swiss psychiatrist Medard Boss’s house in Zollikon near Zürich. We reexamine these seminars fifty years later almost to the day, and today we focus on his seminar of 11 and 14 May 1965. Heidegger tries to help his audience make what he calls a ‘leap to the ‘body-problem’. He laments the blindness to phenomena in the supposedly scientific accounts of the relation between ‘psyche’ and ‘soma’. He gives an exemplary, lucid analysis of the logical contradictions in a ‘sovereign’, recently published lecture by Hegglin on ‘psychosomatic medicine’. He contradicts Hegglin’s claim that, while sadness cannot be measured, tears ‘can be investigated quantitatively’. Tears, insists Heidegger, cannot be measured, although drops of fluid can. This ‘simple’ thinking is indispensable if psychotherapists want to think at all.

Venue:    ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE

Cost:    Psychotherapy trainees £120, others £150, some bursaries; coffee, tea, biscuits, mineral water included; payable in advance; no refunds or transfers unless seminar cancelled

Apply to: Anthony Stadlen, ‘Oakleigh’, 2A Alexandra AvenueLondon N22 7XE
Tel: +44 (0) 20 8888 6857     E-mail: stadlen@aol.com

For further information on seminars, visit: http://anthonystadlen.blogspot.com/

The Inner Circle Seminars were founded by Anthony Stadlen in 1996 as an ethical, existential, phenomenological search for truth in psychotherapy. They have been kindly described by Thomas Szasz as ‘Institute for Advanced Studies in the Moral Foundations of Human Decency and Helpfulness’. But they are independent of all institutes, schools and colleges.